Apple
APPLE INC (Form: SD, Received: 02/12/2015 06:08:10)

 

 

UNITED STATES

SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION

Washington, D.C. 20549

 

 

FORM SD

Specialized Disclosure Report

 

 

 

 

LOGO

APPLE INC.

(Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter)

 

California 001-36743 94-2404110

(State or other jurisdiction

of incorporation or organization)

(Commission

File Number)

(IRS Employer

Identification No.)

1 Infinite Loop

Cupertino, California 95014

(Address of principal executive offices) (Zip Code)

D. Bruce Sewell

Senior Vice President,

General Counsel and Secretary

(408) 996-1010

(Name and telephone number, including area code, of the

person to contact in connection with this report.)

Check the appropriate box to indicate the rule pursuant to which this form is being filed, and provide the period to which the information in this form applies:

 

[x] Rule 13p-1 under the Securities Exchange Act (17 CFR 240.13p-1) for the reporting period from January 1 to December 31, 2014.

 

 

 


Section 1 - Conflict Minerals Disclosure

Items 1.01 and 1.02 Conflict Minerals Disclosure and Report, Exhibit

Conflict Minerals Disclosure

A copy of Apple Inc.’s (“Apple’s”) Conflict Minerals Report for the reporting period January 1, 2014 to December 31, 2014 is provided as Exhibit 1.01 hereto and is publicly available at investor.apple.com/sec.cfm. Apple’s determination and related disclosures relating to materials that may come from recycled and scrap sources are included in Apple’s Conflict Minerals Report and incorporated by reference herein.

Section 2 – Exhibits

Item 2.01 Exhibits

Exhibit 1.01 – Conflict Minerals Report for the reporting period January 1, 2014 to December 31, 2014.

* * * * *


SIGNATURE

Pursuant to the requirements of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, the registrant has duly caused this report to be signed on its behalf by the duly authorized undersigned.

APPLE INC.

 

By:

  /s/ D. Bruce Sewell

Date: February 12, 2015
  D. Bruce Sewell
  Senior Vice President,
  General Counsel and Secretary


EXHIBIT INDEX

 

Exhibit        

Number        

  

Description

1.01

   Conflict Minerals Report for the reporting period January 1, 2014 to December 31, 2014.

EXHIBIT 1.01

 

LOGO

CONFLICT MINERALS REPORT

 

Introduction

This Report has been prepared pursuant to Rule 13p-1 under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended, for the reporting period from January 1 to December 31, 2014.

This Report relates to the process undertaken for Apple products that were manufactured, or contracted to be manufactured, during calendar year 2014 and that contain gold, columbite-tantalite (coltan), cassiterite, wolframite, tantalum, tin, and tungsten (collectively, the “Subject Minerals”).

These products are Apple’s iPhone®, iPad®, Mac®, iPod®, Apple TV®, displays, and Apple accessories.* Third-party products that Apple retails but that it does not manufacture or contract to manufacture are outside of the scope of this Report.

When this Report uses the term “conflict-free,” it means the minerals, smelters or refiners have been verified as complying with the Conflict-Free Sourcing Initiative’s Conflict-Free Smelter Program (the “CFSP”) or an equivalent third-party audit program.

Apple’s Conflict Minerals Program

Apple is dedicated to ensuring ethical sourcing, and has made significant progress toward using only conflict-free minerals in its products. Rather than funnel its demand through a limited number of smelters and refiners, or avoid entirely those sourcing in Central Africa, Apple is expanding the base of smelters and refiners that have been verified as conflict-free.

Apple’s strategy of continuous engagement and accountability has driven real change. The number of conflict-free smelters and refiners in Apple’s supply chain has more than doubled in the past year, so that a majority of the identified and reported smelters and refiners as of December 31, 2014 have been verified as conflict-free. More than 88% of the identified smelters and refiners have either successfully completed conflict-free audits or have begun the audit process, and Apple is working with its suppliers to verify the rest or remove them from its supply chain.

Apple began investigating the uses of tantalum, tin, tungsten, and gold in its products in 2009. In 2010, Apple became one of the first companies to begin mapping its supply chain to the smelter or refiner level, in order to identify the smelters and refiners its suppliers use and to understand potential entry points into its supply chain for tantalum, tin, tungsten, and gold.

 

 

Apple Inc. | 2014 Conflict Minerals Report | 1


Since 2011, Apple has been driving smelters and refiners to comply with the CFSP or equivalent independent third-party audit programs. In February 2014, Apple announced that all tantalum smelters known to be in its supply chain had been designated conflict-free, and that remained the case throughout the year. Apple has also added another layer of accountability by publishing its smelters’ and refiners’ names, countries and CFSP participation status, and updating this list publicly each quarter.

The progress is clear. For calendar year 2014, Apple identified 233 smelters and refiners as potential sources of Subject Minerals that were reported to be in its supply chain at some point during the year. In order to provide the most current compliance status, Apple further narrowed this list to 225 smelters and refiners that Apple believes were operational and still in its supply chain as of December 31, 2014. Of those 225 smelters and refiners, 135 have been verified as conflict-free, and an additional 64 have begun the audit process.

 

    Smelters and refiners verified as conflict-free or in the audit process

 

  

Tantalum

 

    37 of 37 (100%)  

 

Tin

 

  50 of 55 (91%)

 

Tungsten

 

  31 of 32 (97%)

 

Gold

 

    81 of 101 (80%)  

 

  

 

 

Total

199 of 225 (88%)

The number of smelters and refiners in Apple’s supply chain as of December 31, 2014 that are verified as conflict-free or in the audit process, is more than double the comparable number for the prior year.

 

     Status of identified

     smelters and refiners

 

                2014                 

 

                2013                 

 

  

Verified conflict-free

 

135

 

59

 

Participating in an audit process

 

64

 

23

 

Not participating

26 104
  

 

 

 

 

Total

 

225

 

186

 

 

In early 2014, Apple launched a campaign that established strict deadlines for smelters and refiners to demonstrate their progress toward participating in a conflict minerals audit by the end of 2014. Unfortunately, there were four smelters and refiners that refused to engage in the process, and they have been notified of their termination. In addition, Apple newly engaged with 22 smelters and refiners in 2014 and is actively working to get them to participate in the process. Apple is giving them a deadline of compliance or participation by the end of 2015, or they will be removed from Apple’s supply chain. Apple will continue to keep up the pressure until all unaudited smelters and refiners are either verified or no longer in Apple’s supply chain.

 

 

Apple Inc. | 2014 Conflict Minerals Report | 2


In addition to engaging with smelters and refiners across the world, Apple has worked closely with the Conflict-Free Sourcing Initiative (the “CFSI”) to provide financial and in-kind support and expertise. Apple has served in leadership roles on the CFSI, including on the audit review and steering committees. Apple helped drive improvements to the CFSI’s systems, processes, and audits, and Apple used its experience to train other CFSI members on how to effectively engage with smelters, refiners, and other stakeholders for maximum positive impact.

In order to expand the smelter base, Apple also has been encouraging a wide range of trade associations, enterprises in peer industries such as jewelry and banking, and metal exchanges around the world to conduct due diligence on their supply chains and use their influence to increase verified supply lines.

Apple remains committed to driving economic development and creating opportunities to source conflict-free minerals from the Democratic Republic of the Congo (the “DRC”) and adjoining countries. To that end, Apple is working with non-governmental organizations, trade groups, and government agencies to promote change. Apple has provided financial support for in-region programs, including the Conflict-Free Tin Initiative, the ITRI Tin Supply Chain Initiative, KEMET’s Partnership for Social and Economic Sustainability, Solutions for Hope, Partnership Africa Canada, and the Public-Private Alliance for Responsible Minerals Trade. For example, Apple worked with Solutions for Hope to provide iPads and solar chargers to the Diamond Development Initiative to support a registration system for artisanal miners in DRC regions affected by conflict. Using a mobile mapping and survey application developed by Solutions for Hope, this registration enables artisanal miners to enjoy more formal protections and better economic opportunities. Apple also provided funding through the foundation Humanity United to advance Partnership Africa Canada’s work to track, certify, and export artisanal gold from eastern DRC, which includes the creation of economic incentives for local miners and traders to sell via legal sales channels.

Apple requires all of its suppliers to adhere to its Conflict Minerals Standard. This standard is available on Apple’s website, along with Apple’s annual supplier responsibility progress reports. Apple expects its suppliers to implement policies and due diligence measures in accordance with its Conflict Minerals Standard, and the suppliers are required to make their policies available to Apple. If a supplier fails to comply with Apple’s Conflict Minerals Standard, Apple will take measures up to and including termination of its relationship with the supplier.

Continuous Improvement in Understanding Sources of Minerals

In order to understand the sources of the Subject Minerals used in its complex and multi-tiered supply chain, Apple has implemented an extensive survey program. Apple’s Conflict Minerals Standard requires that all of its suppliers map their supply chains down to the smelters and refiners and report the results to Apple. Accordingly, in 2014, Apple surveyed more than 450 suppliers that contribute to Apple products.

Apple suppliers have in some cases reported smelters and refiners that Apple believes are not operational or may have been misidentified as smelters and refiners. As a result, Apple continues to conduct independent research on smelters and refiners and to work with suppliers throughout its supply chain to re-validate, improve, and refine their reported information, taking into account supply chain fluctuations and other changes in status or scope and relationships over time.

 

 

Apple Inc. | 2014 Conflict Minerals Report | 3


Apple continues to monitor reported and newly identified smelters and refiners to drive them to be verified. New smelters and refiners continue to be identified as a result of improved reporting through multiple layers of the supply chain, corporate acquisitions, and new smelting and refining operations that desire to sell into Apple’s supply chain. Once a smelter or refiner is identified in Apple’s supply chain and is willing to participate in the audit, prior to being audited, a smelter or refiner must prepare a significant amount of relevant documentation, improve systems that may be lacking, develop and implement policies around sourcing, train staff, and engage in in-region sourcing programs, as applicable.

Based on information received through the CFSP or equivalent independent third-party audit programs, as well as a third-party review of publicly available information about identified smelters and refiners, Apple has documented the country of origin information of particular smelters and refiners. The CFSP collects evidence from smelters and refiners demonstrating that responsible sourcing procedures and systems have been implemented. The CFSP works with complementary programs in Central Africa to validate conflict-free mine sites and trade routes. Regional traceability and other third-party programs work with non-governmental organizations, government programs, and the CFSP to improve procedures and systems when incidents occur and they communicate relevant information to program participants as it becomes available. Apple continues to engage with these third-party programs to encourage further improvement and reliability. Apple believes that independent third-party audit programs provide a reasonable basis for companies to conclude that smelters and refiners have procedures and systems for determining if the smelters and refiners process Subject Minerals that directly or indirectly finance or benefit armed groups.

Due Diligence

Design of Due Diligence

Apple designed its due diligence measures to conform to the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development Due Diligence Guidance for Responsible Supply Chains of Minerals from Conflict-Affected and High-Risk Areas: Second Edition, including the related supplements on tantalum, tin, tungsten, and gold.

Due Diligence Measures Performed

Based on its assessment of survey responses received from suppliers, Apple implemented due diligence measures with 233 smelters and refiners that were identified as potential sources of Subject Minerals in Apple’s products. These due diligence measures included engaging directly with unverified smelters and refiners to drive them to comply with the CFSP or an equivalent third-party audit program. Apple personnel also conducted 38 visits with smelters and refiners and traders, and established action plans with particular smelters and refiners, to prepare them to undergo conflict minerals audits. Additionally, Apple commissioned a third-party review of publicly available information on the identified smelters and refiners reported to Apple, providing additional information to determine the country of origin of those smelters that have not gone through the CFSP or an equivalent independent third-party audit.

Apple also directed its suppliers to ensure that their smelters and refiners undergo audits to verify compliance with the CFSP or an equivalent audit program. Where particular smelters or refiners were unwilling to engage with Apple or seek compliance with the CFSP or equivalent independent third-party audit programs, Apple required its suppliers to terminate their relationships with those smelters and refiners, and/or work with their suppliers to remove these smelters and refiners from their supply chain. It can take many months to communicate requirements down through the various levels of the supply chain and reach direct customers of a smelter or refiner, as well as several reporting cycles through multiple levels of the supply chain to confirm a smelter or refiner has been removed from a supply chain and from the conflict minerals reporting associated with it.

 

 

Apple Inc. | 2014 Conflict Minerals Report | 4


Risk Mitigation and Future Due Diligence Measures

Apple will keep improving its due diligence measures by taking the following steps, among others:

 

   

Continuing to pressure smelters and refiners directly to become verified as having conflict-free sources of Subject Minerals, or have them removed from Apple’s supply chain;

 

 

   

Continuing to drive its suppliers to obtain current, accurate, and complete information about their smelters and refiners of Subject Minerals;

 

 

   

Continuing to work with its suppliers to help them understand and satisfy Apple’s Subject Minerals requirements fully; and

 

 

   

Continuing to engage with third-party programs to encourage further improvement and reliability in traceability programs.

 

Determination

Based on the information provided by Apple’s suppliers and its own due diligence efforts with known smelters and refiners through December 31, 2014, Apple believes that the facilities that may have been used to process the Subject Minerals in Apple products include the smelters and refiners listed in Annex I below.

Based on these due diligence efforts, Apple does not have sufficient information to conclusively determine the countries of origin of the Subject Minerals in its products or whether the Subject Minerals in its products are from recycled or scrap sources. However, based on the information provided by Apple’s suppliers, smelters, and refiners, as well as from the CFSI and other sources, Apple believes that the countries of origin of the Subject Minerals contained in its products include the countries listed in Annex II below, as well as recycled and scrap sources.

Of the 233 smelters and refiners of Subject Minerals identified for calendar year 2014, 24 smelters and refiners were identified as sources of Subject Minerals from the DRC or adjoining countries. Of these 24, 21 were determined CFSP-compliant and one was found to be no longer operational. One of the two remaining is preparing to be audited. The final remaining refiner has not yet undertaken a third-party audit, and Apple is requiring its suppliers to remove the refiner from its supply chain. Apple found no reasonable basis for concluding that this refiner, or the other smelter preparing to be audited, sourced Subject Minerals that directly or indirectly finance or benefit armed groups.

Apple has provided information as of the date of this Report. Subsequent events, such as the inability or unwillingness of any suppliers, smelters or refiners to comply with Apple’s Conflict Minerals Standard, may affect Apple’s future determinations under Rule 13p-1.

* Does not include Beats Electronics products in accordance with Instruction to Item 1.01(3) of Form SD.

 

 

Apple Inc. | 2014 Conflict Minerals Report | 5


ANNEX I

 

Subject

Mineral

Smelter or Refiner Name

Country location of

Smelter or Refiner

     

Gold

 

Aida Chemical Industries Co., Ltd. Japan
     

Gold

 

Allgemeine Gold-und Silberscheideanstalt A.G. Germany
     

Gold

 

Almalyk Mining and Metallurgical Complex Uzbekistan
     

Gold

 

AngloGold Ashanti Córrego do Sítio Mineraçäo Brazil
     

Gold

 

Argor-Heraeus SA Switzerland
     

Gold

 

Asahi Pretec Corporation Japan
     

Gold

 

Asaka Riken Co., Ltd. Japan
     

Gold

 

Atasay Kuyumculuk Sanayi Ve Ticaret A.S. Turkey
     

Gold

 

Aurubis AG Germany
     

Gold

 

Bangko Sentral ng Pilipinas (Central Bank of the Philippines) Philippines
     

Gold

 

Bauer Walser AG Germany
     

Gold

 

Boliden AB Sweden
     

Gold

 

C. Hafner GmbH + Co. KG Germany
     

Gold

 

Caridad Mexico
     

Gold

 

CCR Refinery – Glencore Canada Corporation Canada
     

Gold

 

Cendres + Métaux SA Switzerland
     

Gold

 

Chimet S.p.A. Italy
     

Gold

 

Chugai Mining Co., Ltd. Japan
     

Gold

 

Daye Non-Ferrous Metals Mining Ltd. China
     

Gold

 

Do Sung Corporation Republic of Korea
     

Gold

 

Doduco GmbH Germany
     

Gold

 

Dowa Japan
     

Gold

 

ECO-System Recycling Co., Ltd. Japan
     

Gold

 

FSE Novosibirsk Refinery Russia

 

 

Apple Inc. | 2014 Conflict Minerals Report | A-1


     

Gold

 

Gansu Seemine Material High-Tech Co. Ltd. China
     

Gold

 

Guangdong Jinding Gold Ltd. China
     

Gold

 

Hangzhou Fuchunjiang Smelting Co., Ltd. China
     

Gold

 

Heimerle + Meule GmbH Germany
     

Gold

 

Heraeus Ltd. Hong Kong China
     

Gold

 

Heraeus Precious Metals GmbH & Co. KG Germany
     

Gold

 

Hunan Chenzhou Mining Group Co., Ltd. China
     

Gold

 

Hwasung CJ Co. Ltd Republic of Korea
     

Gold

 

Inner Mongolia Qiankun Gold and Silver Refinery Share Company Ltd. China
     

Gold

 

Ishifuku Metal Industry Co., Ltd. Japan
     

Gold

 

Istanbul Gold Refinery Turkey
     

Gold

 

Japan Mint Japan
     

Gold

 

Jiangxi Copper Co., Ltd. China
     

Gold

 

Johnson Matthey Inc. United States
     

Gold

 

Johnson Matthey Ltd. Canada
     

Gold

 

JSC Ekaterinburg Non-Ferrous Metal Processing Plant Russia
     

Gold

 

JSC UralElectromed Russia
     

Gold

 

JX Nippon Mining & Metals Co., Ltd. Japan
     

Gold

 

Kazzinc Ltd. Kazakhstan
     

Gold

 

Kennecott Utah Copper LLC United States
     

Gold

 

Kojima Chemicals Co., Ltd. Japan
     

Gold

 

Korea Metal Co. Ltd. Republic of Korea
     

Gold

 

Kyrgyzaltyn JSC Kyrgyzstan
     

Gold

 

L’azurde Company For Jewelry Saudi Arabia
     

Gold

 

Lingbao Gold Co., Ltd. China
     

Gold

 

Lingbao Jinyuan Tonghui Refinery Co. Ltd. China

 

 

Apple Inc. | 2014 Conflict Minerals Report | A-2


     

Gold

 

LS-Nikko Copper Inc. Republic of Korea
     

Gold

 

Luoyang Zijin Yinhui Metal Smelting Co. Ltd. China
     

Gold

 

Materion Corporation United States
     

Gold

 

Matsuda Sangyo Co., Ltd. Japan
     

Gold

 

Met-Mex Peñoles, S.A. Mexico
     

Gold

 

Metalor Technologies (Hong Kong) Ltd. China
     

Gold

 

Metalor Technologies SA Switzerland
     

Gold

 

Metalor Technologies Singapore Pte Ltd. Singapore
     

Gold

 

Metalor USA Refining Corporation United States
     

Gold

 

Mitsubishi Materials Corp. Japan
     

Gold

 

Mitsui Mining and Smelting Co., Ltd. Japan
     

Gold

 

Moscow Special Alloys Processing Plant Russia
     

Gold

 

Nadir Metal Rafineri San. Ve Tic. A.Ş. Turkey
     

Gold

 

Navoi Mining and Metallurgy Combinat Uzbekistan
     

Gold

 

Nihon Material Co. Ltd. Japan
     

Gold

 

Ohio Precious Metals, LLC United States
     

Gold

 

Ohura Precious Metal Industry Co., Ltd. Japan
     
Gold

OJSC “The Gulidov Krasnoyarsk Non-Ferrous Metals Plant” - (OJSC Krastvetmet)

 

Russia

     

Gold

 

OJSC Kolyma Refinery Russia
     

Gold

 

Pamp SA Switzerland
     

Gold

 

Penglai Penggang Gold Industry Co. Ltd. China
     

Gold

 

Prioksky Plant of Non-Ferrous Metals Russia
     

Gold

 

PT Aneka Tambang (Persero) Tbk Indonesia
     

Gold

 

PX Précinox SA Switzerland
     

Gold

 

Rand Refinery (Pty) Ltd. South Africa

 

 

Apple Inc. | 2014 Conflict Minerals Report | A-3


     

Gold

 

Royal Canadian Mint Canada
     

Gold

 

Sabin Metal Corp. United States
     

Gold

 

Samwon Metals Corp. Republic of Korea
     

Gold

 

Schone Edelmetaal Netherlands
     

Gold

 

SEMPSA Joyería Platería, S.A. Spain
     

Gold

 

Shandong Zhaojin Gold & Silver Refinery Co., Ltd. China
     

Gold

 

SOE Shyolkovsky Factory of Secondary Precious Metals Russia
     

Gold

 

Solar Applied Materials Technology Corp. Taiwan
     

Gold

 

Sumitomo Metal Mining Co., Ltd. Japan
     

Gold

 

Tanaka Kikinzoku Kogyo K.K. Japan
     

Gold

 

The Great Wall Gold & Silver Refinery of China China
     

Gold

 

The Refinery of Shandong Gold Mining Co. Ltd. China
     

Gold

 

Tokuriki Honten Co., Ltd. Japan
     

Gold

 

Tongling Nonferrous Metals Group Holdings Co., Ltd. China
     

Gold

 

Torecom Republic of Korea
     

Gold

 

Umicore Brazil Ltda Brazil
     

Gold

 

Umicore Precious Metals Thailand Thailand
     

Gold

 

Umicore SA Business Unit Precious Metals Refining Belgium
     

Gold

 

United Precious Metal Refining, Inc. United States
     

Gold

 

Valcambi SA Switzerland
     

Gold

 

Western Australian Mint trading as The Perth Mint Australia
     

Gold

 

Yamamoto Precious Metal Co., Ltd. Japan
     

Gold

 

Yokohama Metal Co. Ltd. Japan
     

Gold

 

Yunnan Copper Industry Co. Ltd. China
     

Gold

 

Zhongyuan Gold Smelter of Zhongjin Gold Corporation China
     

Gold

 

Zijin Mining Group Co. Ltd. China

 

 

Apple Inc. | 2014 Conflict Minerals Report | A-4


     

Tin

 

Alpha United States
     

Tin

 

China Rare Metal Material Co., Ltd. China
     

Tin

 

China Tin Group Co., Ltd. China
     

Tin

 

CNMC (Guangxi) PGMA Co. Ltd. China
     

Tin

 

Cooper Santa Brazil
     

Tin

 

CV Gita Pesona Indonesia
     

Tin

 

CV JusTindo Indonesia
     

Tin

 

CV Nurjanah Indonesia
     

Tin

 

CV Serumpun Sebalai Indonesia
     

Tin

 

CV United Smelting Indonesia
     

Tin

 

Dowa Metals & Mining Co. Ltd. Japan
     

Tin

 

EM Vinto Bolivia
     

Tin

 

Fenix Metals Poland
     

Tin

 

Gejiu Kai Meng Industry and Trade LLC China    
     
Tin

Gejiu Non-Ferrous Metal Processing Co. Ltd.

 

China
     
Tin

Gejiu Zi-Li

 

China
     
Tin

Huichang Jinshunda Tin Co. Ltd.

 

China
     
Tin

Magnu’s Minerals Metais e Ligas Ltda

 

Brazil
     
Tin

Malaysia Smelting Corporation

 

Malaysia
     
Tin

Melt Metais e Ligas Ltda.

 

Brazil
     
Tin

Metallo Chimique

 

Belgium
     
Tin

Mineração Taboca S.A.

 

Brazil
     
Tin

Minsur S.A.

 

Peru
     
Tin

Mitsubishi Materials Corporation

 

Japan
     
Tin

Novosibirsk Integrated Tin Works*

 

Russia
     
Tin

O.M. Manufacturing (Thailand) Co., Ltd.

 

Thailand

 

 

Apple Inc. | 2014 Conflict Minerals Report | A-5


     
Tin

O.M. Manufacturing Philippines, Inc.

 

Philippines
     
Tin

Operaciones Metalúrgicas S. A.

 

Bolivia
     
Tin

PT Alam Lestari Kencana*

 

Indonesia
     
Tin

PT Artha Cipta Langgeng

 

Indonesia
     
Tin

PT ATD Makmur Mandiri Jaya

 

Indonesia
     
Tin

PT Babel Inti Perkasa

 

Indonesia
     
Tin

PT Bangka Kudai Tin*

 

Indonesia
     
Tin

PT Bangka Putra Karya

 

Indonesia
     
Tin

PT Bangka Timah Utama Sejahtera*

 

Indonesia
     
Tin

PT Bangka Tin Industry

 

Indonesia
     
Tin

PT Belitung Industri Sejahtera

 

Indonesia
     
Tin

PT BilliTin Makmur Lestari

 

Indonesia
     
Tin

PT Bukit Timah

 

Indonesia
     
Tin

PT DS Jaya Abadi

 

Indonesia
     
Tin

PT Duta Putra Bangka*

 

Indonesia
     
Tin

PT Eunindo Usaha Mandiri

 

Indonesia
     
Tin

PT Inti Stania Prima

 

Indonesia
     
Tin

PT Karimun Mining

 

Indonesia
     
Tin

PT Mitra Stania Prima

 

Indonesia
     
Tin

PT Panca Mega Persada

 

Indonesia
     
Tin

PT Prima Timah Utama

 

Indonesia
     
Tin

PT Refined Bangka Tin

 

Indonesia
     
Tin

PT Sariwiguna Binasentosa

 

Indonesia
     
Tin

PT Seirama Tin Investment

 

Indonesia
     
Tin

PT Stanindo Inti Perkasa

 

Indonesia
     
Tin

PT Tambang Timah

 

Indonesia

 

 

Apple Inc. | 2014 Conflict Minerals Report | A-6


     
Tin

PT Timah (Persero), Tbk

 

Indonesia
     
Tin

PT Timah Nusantara*

 

Indonesia
     
Tin

PT Tinindo Inter Nusa

 

Indonesia
     
Tin

Rui Da Hung Business Co., Ltd.

 

Taiwan
     
Tin

Soft Metais, Ltda.

 

Brazil
     
Tin

Thaisarco

 

Thailand
     
Tin

White Solder Metalurgia e Mineração Ltda.

 

Brazil
     
Tin

Yunnan Chengfeng Non-ferrous Metals Co., Ltd.

 

China
     
Tin

Yunnan Tin Company, Ltd.

 

China
     
Tantalum

Changsha South Tantalum Niobium Co., Ltd.

 

China
     
Tantalum

Conghua Tantalum and Niobium Smeltry

 

China
     
Tantalum

Duoluoshan

 

China
     
Tantalum

Exotech Inc.

 

United States
     
Tantalum

F&X Electro-Materials Ltd.

 

China
     
Tantalum

Gannon & Scott*

 

United States
     
Tantalum

Global Advanced Metals Aizu

 

Japan
     
Tantalum

Global Advanced Metals Boyertown

 

United States
     
Tantalum

Guangdong Zhiyuan New Material Co., Ltd.

 

China
     
Tantalum

H.C. Starck Co., Ltd.

 

Thailand
     
Tantalum

H.C. Starck GmbH Goslar

 

Germany
     
Tantalum

H.C. Starck GmbH Laufenburg

 

Germany
     
Tantalum

H.C. Starck Hermsdorf GmbH

 

Germany
     
Tantalum

H.C. Starck Inc.

 

United States
     
Tantalum

H.C. Starck Ltd.

 

Japan
     
Tantalum

H.C. Starck Smelting GmbH & Co. KG

 

Germany
     
Tantalum

Hengyang King Xing Lifeng New Materials Co., Ltd.

 

China

 

 

Apple Inc. | 2014 Conflict Minerals Report | A-7


     
Tantalum

Hi-Temp Specialty Metals, Inc.

 

United States
     
Tantalum

JiuJiang JinXin Nonferrous Metals Co., Ltd.

 

China
     
Tantalum

Jiujiang Tanbre Co., Ltd.

 

China
     
Tantalum

Kemet Blue Metals

 

Mexico
     
Tantalum

Kemet Blue Powder Corporation

 

United States
     
Tantalum

LSM Brasil S.A.

 

Brazil
     
Tantalum

Metallurgical Products India (Pvt.) Ltd.

 

India
     
Tantalum

Mineração Taboca S.A.

 

Brazil
     
Tantalum

Mitsui Mining & Smelting

 

Japan
     
Tantalum

Molycorp Silmet A.S.

 

Estonia
     
Tantalum

Ningxia Orient Tantalum Industry Co., Ltd.

 

China
     
Tantalum

Plansee SE Liezen

 

Austria
     
Tantalum

Plansee SE Reutte

 

Austria
     
Tantalum

QuantumClean

 

United States
     
Tantalum

RFH Tantalum Smeltry Co., Ltd.

 

China
     
Tantalum

Solikamsk Magnesium Works OAO

 

Russia
     
Tantalum

Taki Chemicals Co., Ltd.

 

Japan
     
Tantalum

Tantalite Resources*

 

South Africa
     
Tantalum

Telex Metals LLC

 

United States
     
Tantalum

Ulba

 

Kazakhstan
     
Tantalum

Yichun Jin Yang Rare Metal Co., Ltd.

 

China
     
Tantalum

Zhuzhou Cement Carbide

 

China
     
Tungsten

A.L.M.T. Corp.

 

Japan
     
Tungsten

Chenzhou Diamond Tungsten Products Co., Ltd.

 

China
     
Tungsten

Chongyi Zhangyuan Tungsten Co., Ltd.

 

China
     
Tungsten

Dayu Weiliang Tungsten Co., Ltd.

 

China

 

 

Apple Inc. | 2014 Conflict Minerals Report | A-8


     
Tungsten

FuJian JinXin Tungsten Co., Ltd.

 

China
     
Tungsten

Ganzhou Huaxing Tungsten Products Co., Ltd.

 

China
     
Tungsten

Ganzhou Jiangwu Ferrotungsten Co., Ltd.

 

China
     
Tungsten

Ganzhou Non-ferrous Metals Smelting Co., Ltd.

 

China
     
Tungsten

Ganzhou Seadragon W & Mo Co., Ltd.

 

China
     
Tungsten

Global Tungsten & Powders Corp.

 

United States
     
Tungsten

Guangdong Xianglu Tungsten Co., Ltd.

 

China
     
Tungsten

H.C. Starck Smelting GmbH & Co. KG

 

Germany
     
Tungsten

H.C. Starck GmbH

 

Germany
     
Tungsten

Hunan Chenzhou Mining Group Co., Ltd.

 

China
     
Tungsten

Hunan Chunchang Nonferrous Metals Co., Ltd.

 

China
     
Tungsten

Japan New Metals Co., Ltd.

 

Japan
     
Tungsten

Jiangwu H.C. Starck Tungsten Products Co., Ltd.

 

China
     
Tungsten

Jiangxi Gan Bei Tungsten Co., Ltd.

 

China
     
Tungsten

Jiangxi Minmetals Gao’an Non-ferrous Metals Co., Ltd.

 

China
     
Tungsten

Jiangxi Tonggu Non-ferrous Metallurgical & Chemical Co., Ltd.

 

China
     
Tungsten

Jiangxi Xinsheng Tungsten Industry Co., Ltd.

 

China
     
Tungsten

Kennametal Fallon

 

United States
     
Tungsten

Kennametal Huntsville

 

United States
     
Tungsten

Malipo Haiyu Tungsten Co., Ltd.

 

China
     
Tungsten

Nui Phao H.C. Starck Tungsten Chemicals Manufacturing LLC

 

Vietnam
     
Tungsten

Tejing (Vietnam) Tungsten Co., Ltd.

 

Vietnam
     
Tungsten

Vietnam Youngsun Tungsten Industry Co., Ltd.

 

Vietnam
     
Tungsten

Wolfram Bergbau and Hütten AG

 

Austria
     
Tungsten

Wolfram Co., CJSC

 

Russia
     
Tungsten

Xiamen Tungsten (HC) Co., Ltd.

 

China
     
Tungsten

Xiamen Tungsten Co., Ltd.

 

China
     
Tungsten

Xinhai Rendan Shaoguan Tungsten Co., Ltd.

 

China

*Smelters and refiners that Apple believes are no longer operational or are no longer in Apple’s supply chain as of December 31, 2014.

 

 

Apple Inc. | 2014 Conflict Minerals Report | A-9


ANNEX II

 

Angola

Argentina

Australia

Austria

Belgium

Bolivia

Brazil

Burundi

Canada

Central African Republic

Chile

China

Colombia

Côte D’Ivoire

Czech Republic

Democratic Republic of the Congo

Djibouti

Egypt

Estonia

Ethiopia

France

Germany

Guyana

Hungary

India

Indonesia

Ireland

Israel

Japan

Kazakhstan

Kenya

Laos

Luxembourg

Madagascar

Malaysia

Mongolia

Mozambique

Myanmar

Netherlands

Nigeria

Peru

Portugal

Republic of Congo

Republic of Korea

Russia

Rwanda

Sierra Leone

Singapore

Slovakia

South Africa

South Sudan

Spain

Suriname

Switzerland

Taiwan

Tanzania

Thailand

Uganda

United Kingdom

United States

Vietnam

Zambia

Zimbabwe

 

 

 

Apple Inc. | 2014 Conflict Minerals Report | A-10